2000 Level Courses

AP/GEOG 2030 3.00 - THE END OF THE EARTH AS WE KNOW IT: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

This course explores how human society has transformed the earth system and investigates the social, economic and political implications of contemporary environmental change. Topics include deforestation, climate change, biodiversity loss and natural disasters such as hurricanes, flooding and drought. Internet access is required.

This course is designed to introduce students to human-environment geography by exploring both historical and contemporary human-induced transformations of the earth system. The objectives are to better understand how and why the global environment is changing; what the societal implications of these changes are; and the ways in which individuals and societies adapt to, respond to, and mitigate environmental change. We will investigate the decision to act and the decision not to act on the part of individuals, governments, activist organizations and corporations.

While it is tempting to see global environmental change as a large scale phenomenon and problem, it is not limited to the global scale. Both the impacts of global environmental change (GEC) and responses to it occur across scale and are geographically variable. In order to stress this dimension of GEC, this course will examine the local manifestations of these global processes. Much of our tutorial discussion regarding the effects of and responses to global environmental change will be focused on three locales: Highland Thailand, Urban Canada: Toronto and Arctic Canada.

Recommended prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00, AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2030 3.00.

Format: Weekly lecture and tutorials

Assignments: Tutorial component 60%; and final 40%

Required Reading: To be announced.

Instructor: E. Lunstrum

AP GEOG 2060 3.00 - HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY – OFFERED SUMMER 2015

An exploration of the content of and approaches to historical geography, with a focus on major historical shifts in the geography and geographic knowledge of human beings, such as imperialism, mass migration and urbanization.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2060 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: R. Anderson

AP/GEOG 2070 3.00 – EMPIRE, STATE & POWER: AN INTRODUCTION TO POLICIAL GEOGRAPHY

This course explores the geography, ideology, expansion and representation of empire, colonialism, settlers and colonized. The historical-geographical perspective will highlight the importance of space and place as mechanisms of control and domination, at multiple scales.

Expanded Description: Throughout this course, emphasis is placed on a critical reading and analysis of the ideology, expansion and representation of empire, colonialism, settlers and the colonized. The historical-geographical perspective will highlight the importance of space and place as mechanism of control and domination, at multiple scales. Topics covered include imperial geography; geography and ideology of empire; British Empire; slave trade; French Empire and colonialism; the Maghreb and colonial rule; Empire of Japan; Japanese colonization of Korea and; Canada and colonialism; empire and culture; and empire, knowledge and scholarship. Throughout the course concepts and discussions of gender, race, sexuality and borders will be addressed and incorporated into each week’s lectures. This course will emphasize not only a critical understanding of empire and colonialism through texts and readings, but also through maps and photographs. Case studies include readings on Jamaica, Morocco, Algeria and Korea.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2070 3.00

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Required Readings: Please refer to course syllabus for required reading list.

Assignments: Participation (15%), short essay (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (35%)

Instructor: S. Koopman

AP/GEOG 2075 3.00 – EVERYDAY LIFE: AN INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

This course critically explores 'everyday life' and the spaces and places through which it is experiences, reproduced, represented and negotiated. Topics covered include, geographies of mobility; urban parks; geographies of capitalism; geographies of cinema; surveillance; geographies of boredom and silence; geographies of deliberation and everyday sites of citizenship and identity formation.

Expanded Description: Throughout this course, emphasis is placed on a critical reading and analysis of ‘everyday life’ and the spaces and places through which it is experienced, represented and negotiated. Students will be introduced to important socio-spatial theorists who have demonstrated that the ‘everyday’, ‘banal’ and ‘common’ are as important as the ‘macro’, ‘global’ and ‘exceptional’, and that, in fact, they are inseparable. As such, the concept of scale and scalar processes will be emphasized in the lectures and assignments. Topics covered include, geographies of mobility; urban parks; geographies of capitalism; geographies of cinema; the banality of surveillance; geographies of boredom and silence; geographies of deliberation and everyday sites of citizenship and identity formation. Other than academic readings, students will be asked to consider other means/media of sharing and constructing knowledge about everyday life, including their own knowledge about everyday life spaces. Photographs, novels, visual art and music will be used to demonstrate how geographies of everyday life are articulated and represented in other practices of everyday life. Notions of gender, class, race, sexuality will be incorporated into each week’s lectures and discussions.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2075 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: Please refer to course syllabus for required reading list.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: S. Koopman

AP/GEOG 2105 3.00 - MONEY, POWER AND SPACE: INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY

This course introduces the field of economic geography, addressing spatial dimensions of: wealth and poverty; structures of production and commodity chains; patterns and processes of retailing and consumption; the role of states in economic governance; the struggles of organized labour; the organization of transnational corporations; and, the ways in which ethnic identity and gender shape economic life.

Prerequisites: One of AP/GEOG 1000 6.00, AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, AK/GEOG 2500 6.00, or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusions: AP/GEOG 2100 6.00 and AP/GEOG 2105 6.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: Coe, N. Kelly, P. Yeung, H (2007) Economic Geography:

Assignments: In-class tests(15%) each, Analytical Assignment (30%) Reading Response Papers (40%)

Instructor: P. Kelly

AP/GEOG 2220 6.00 - URBAN GEOGRAPHY

In a world where over 50 per cent of the population lives in urban areas, cities play a significant role in shaping the social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental conditions of people's everyday
lives. This course introduces the geographical literature on the urbanization process in historical and contemporary perspective. It provides students with the foundations of urban processes and patterns, urban systems and structure, and urban social/cultural issues from a geographical perspective.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 3120 6.00 and AK/GEOG 3430 6.00.
Format: Three hours per week.
Required reading: Bunting, T., Filion, P. & Walker, R. (eds) (2010) Canadian Cities in Transition: New Directions in the Twenty-First Century, 4th Edition. Toronto: Oxford University Press.
Assignments: Two assignments (60%); participation (10%); and mid-term
and final exam (30%)

Instructor: A. Bain

AP/GEOG 2305 3.00 – INDENTITIES: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL GEOGRAPHY

This course examines the production, reproduction and mediation of identities through space and place at various scales. The course will introduce students to the complex relations between space, place and identity, and ask them to think critically about the spaces of their own lives.

Expanded Description: Throughout this course, emphasis is placed on a critical reading and analysis of the production, reproduction and mediation of identities though space, place and scales. This course will introduce students to the complex relations between space, place and identity, as well as the ways in which these relations and their practices are manifested in space and time. Topics covered include imperialism, colonialism and national identities; citizenship and identity politics; mobility and identity; race, class and identity formation, politics and movements; criminalized identities; museums and architecture; global cities; globalization and postmodernity; corporate identities; and sexualities and genders. In addition to academic readings, students will be asked to consider the ways in which architecture, maps, photographs, political slogans, corporate logos, visual art, music, and film help construct, represents and mediate identities.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2305 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: Gill Valentine (2001), Social Geographies: Space and Society, Prentice Hall.

Assignments: Midterm (20%); three assignments (50%); and final exam (30%).

Instructor: TBA

AP/GEOG 2310 6.00 - INTRODUCTION TO REFUGEE AND MIGRATION STUDIES

An introduction to the problem of refugees: conceptual issues (definitions, refugee rights, ethical norms), the historical background, Canadian policy and the issues in specific areas of the world - Africa, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

Cross-listed with AP/REI 2000 6.0

Prerequisite: A 1000 level in a social science discipline.

Course credit exclusions: AP/SOSC 1130 9.00, AP/SOSC 1139 9.00, AS/GEOG 2310 6.0, AK/SOSC 2000 6.0

Format: Three lecture hours weekly

Required Reading: course kit

Assignment: Mid-term 20%, final exam 20%, two assignments 40%, participation 20%

Instructor: V. Preston

AP/SC/GEOG 2340 3.00 – GEOINFORMATICS: INTRODUCTION

This course covers fundamental concepts and approaches of geographical information systems, remote sensing, and global positioning systems. Students also acquire knowledge and skills in descriptive statistics, map design and interpretation, basic computer cartography, photogrammetry, and sensor networks.

Expanded Description: Geoinformatics integrates computer science, geosciences, certain branches of engineering, and cartography such that the geographical context of any phenomena can be measured, quantified, presented, and analyzed. In essence, geographic position forms a critical component in a new information infrastructure. This course will introduce and explore the historical context to geoinformatics by tracing some of the more important historical developments before examining many of the sub-domains of this discipline. We will explore and provide experience with cartography, global positioning systems (GPS), vector and raster geographic information systems (GIS), surveying, photogrammetry, remote sensing, visualization, and other related topics. This course is suitable for geographers and education students majoring in geography, or those genuinely curious about technologies related to geographical analysis, this course will provide a foundation to geoinformatics and basic computer cartography. Computers will be used in the lab sessions and basic computer skills are a prerequisite. Some fieldwork on campus is required.

Prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00; or written permission from the instructor.

Recommended: AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00

Course credit exclusion: AS/AP/SC/GEOG 2350 3.00, LE/EATS 2610 2.0, SC/ENG 2110 2.0

Format: Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week.

Required reading: Shellito, B.A. 2012. Introduction to geospatial technologies. W.H. Freeman and Company: New York. 469 p.

Assessments: 4 assignments 40%, test 20%, discussion forum and participation 7%, and final exam 33%

Instructor: T.K. Remmel

AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00 - THE HYDROSPHERE

This course examines the physical processes and the environmental factors that govern the movement of water and energy in lakes, rivers, oceans and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Boundary-layer climates and mechanisms of water movement and storage are emphasized.

Expanded Description: This course examines the movement and storage of water in various phases near the Earth’s surface and the energy driving the hydrologic cycle. The focus is on the interdependency of water and energy in the hydrosphere. The course begins with a discussion of basic atmospheric and hydrologic processes and then traces the flow of energy and water to and beneath the earth’s surface. Then the return of water from the subsurface to the atmosphere is examined, initially in simple vegetation-free environments and finally in more complex forest systems. Aspects of the cryosphere (snow and ice), and the lateral redistribution of water as runoff on slopes and in drainage basins will also be examined. We will also investigate some of the implications for changing land-use and climate change of these processes. The course is designed to combine a theoretical understanding of the hydrosphere with applied field measurements.

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, AK/GEOG 2510 6.00

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 2400 6.00.

Format: Two lecture hours per week, 16 three-hour laboratories over two terms.

Required Reading: Oke, T.R., (1987), Boundary Layer Climates, Methuen & Co. Ltd. Ward, R.C. and T. Robinson, (2001), Principles of Hydrology, Prentice Hall. Supplemental readings will be placed on reserve in the Geography Geographic Resources Centre.

Assignments: Four tests, eight laboratory exercises.

Instructor: R. Bello/KL Young

AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00 - INTRODUCTORY STATISTICAL ANALYSIS IN GEOGRAPHY

This introductory course aims to provide a working knowledge of several statistical techniques which are widely used in many branches of geography. Some attention is also given to broader questions concerning the nature of the scientific method.

Expanded Description: The course aims to provide the fundamental concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics and a working knowledge of several standard statistical techniques which are widely used in many different branches of geography. Examples of such techniques include measures of central tendency and dispersion (descriptive statistics), comparisons of means and proportions (inferential statistics) and correlation and regression analyses (analyzing relationships and causation). These techniques are used in numerous disciplines, and are not in themselves 'geographical'. Consideration will be given to the nature of geographical data and the examples used in lectures and assignments will be geographical in content. Emphasis will be placed on the concepts underlying each procedure as much as on the mechanics of the numerical calculations. This policy reflects the belief that "knowing why" is just as important as "knowing how". Computers will be used in the lab sessions but no prior knowledge of computers or specific computer programs is assumed.

Prerequisites: 24 credits successfully completed. This course is intended primarily for students majoring in geography and is normally taken during the second year of study. NCR: AK/GEOG 3520 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: AP/ECON 2500 3.00, AP/POLS 3300 6.00, AP/SOCI 3030 6.00, HH/KINE 2050 3.00, HH/KINE 3150 3.00, HH/PSYC 2020 6.00, HH/PSYC 2021 3.00, SC/BIOL 2060 3.00, SC/MATH 2560 3.00, SC/MATH 2565 3.00, SC/MATH 2570 3.00, AK/ADMS 3320 3.00

Format: Two lecture hours per week, nine two-hour laboratory sessions. One term.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: T. Drezner

AP/SC/GEOG 2500 3.00 - INTRODUCTION TO VEGETATION AND SOILS

An introduction to the structure and functioning of vegetation and soil systems, emphasizing local patterns and processes, methods of description and sampling, dynamic processes, response to environmental change and human disturbance. Field work is emphasized in laboratories.

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or A 1000 level science course

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2500 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Course Instructor: A. Medeiros

AP/SC/GEOG 2600 3.00 - GEOMORPHOLOGY I

This course concentrates on basic principles and fundamental concepts in geomorphology, including energy flows in geomorphic systems, hill slope forms and materials, weathering and landforms, and drainage basin geomorphology and hydrology (with a particular emphasis on Canadian examples).

Expanded Description: The course opens with a brief survey of the history of geomorphology as a science. It then surveys modes of formulating significant geomorphological questions and predominant modes of investigation. The course then concentrates on basic principles and fundamental concepts in geomorphology (with a particular emphasis on Canadian examples). Being process-oriented, the course is based on a quantitative approach. The main topics addressed include energy flows in geomorphic systems, hillslope forms and materials, weathering and landforms, drainage basin geomorphology and hydrology, the physical geography of Canada, and periglacial geomorphology. A course website is used.

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or LE/EATS 1010 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 2600 3.00,

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Assignments: Mid-term test: 30%; final exam: 40%; Term paper: 30%.

Required Reading: Trenhaile, A. 2007. Geomorphology, A Canadian Perspective, (3rd edition), Oxford University Press

Instructor: To be announced.

AP/SC/GEOG 2610 3.00 - GEOMORPHOLOGY II

This course concentrates on geomorphic processes and landforms (with a particular emphasis on Canadian examples). Five main areas are explored: fluvial forms and processes; the glaciation of Canada and glacial mechanics; periglaciation; aeolian processes; and coastal processes and landforms.

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2600 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 2610 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours a week plus online assignments.

Required Reading: Trenhaile, A.S. 2013. Geomorphology. A Canadian Perspective (5th edition).

Assignments: To be announced.
Instructor: A. Robert