4000 Level Courses

GEOG 4000 - Honours Thesis

Honours Thesis
An independent piece of research done under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The thesis must be submitted before the end of classes in the winter term; an exact date is established each year. There is an oral examination on the Honours thesis.
Expanded Course Description
In consultation with a faculty advisor, Honours students may choose a topic towards the end of their third year of study, allowing a full year for completion.
The completed thesis must be submitted on a date selected annually by the course coordinator. Normally this date falls in late March, shortly before the end of regular classes.  An oral defense of the Honours Thesis is required. The thesis provides Honours students with an opportunity to work on a major research project of their own choosing or on a project proposed by a faculty member.  Students should seek out an appropriate faculty member who will help to formalize the topic and aid in preparing a detailed outline. This outline must be approved before the end of the winter term in the third year of study.
Students are invited to examine theses written in past years to obtain an idea of the range and scope of topics that have been addressed. These are kept in the Geographic Resources Centre (S403 Ross).
Prerequisites: 84 credits passed
Notes: Only thesis topics in physical geography are eligible for Science (SC) credit

GEOG 4020 - Processes Of Geographic Change: The Caribbean Islands Since 1492

Processes Of Geographic Change: The Caribbean Islands Since 1492
AP GEOG 4020 3.00
This course considers changes in the public perception of the regional character of the Caribbean Islands through five centuries, and then examines the evidence and methods that can be used to assess regional change - both "real" and "imagined".
Note: Weekly reflections posted to WebCT.
Expanded Course Description
The course examines the extent to which the geographic features (both human and physical) of the Caribbean Islands have changed since prehistoric times, and presents a number of possible explanations for such change – including changing relationships between human activity and the “natural” world. Following a brief but intensive review of our understanding of empirical change in the region, the course focuses on the methods used to gather and assess evidence; and critically analyzes the relevance of alternative theories of change.
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed including AP/GEOG 1400 6.00, AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00. AP/GEOG 3020 6.00 is recommended.
Format: 3 h Lecture per week

GEOG 4040 - Urban Historical Geography

Urban Historical Geography
AP GEOG 4040 6.00
A course which examines the historical geography of cities, particularly those of 19th-century North America. The major focus of attention is the role of certain economic and cultural factors in the development of spatial arrangements within and among cities.
Expanded Course Description
This course has three main components. During the first term attention focuses on the cultural and social geography of nineteenth century cities in Britain, the United States and Canada, including Victorian Toronto. Processes and spatial patterns associated with such variables as social class, ethnicity, and race are discussed. The second main emphasis is on the evolution of the North American urban system, especially during the nineteenth century. The third theme is the urban built environment, including town planning. In each case both theoretical and substantive issues are addressed.
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed and one of AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, AP/HIST 2600 6.00
Format: 3h Lecture per week

GEOG 4050 - Nature, Neoliberalism And Political Ecology

Nature, Neoliberalism And Political Ecology
AP GEOG 4050 3.00
This seminar explores complementary scholarship on 'first world' political ecology and the commodification of nature in order to critically explore issues of environmental management and resource conflict. It will draw on case studies about rural and urban North American environments.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed including AP/GEOG 3050 3.00 or permission of Instructor

GEOG 4051 - Comparative Politics Of Environment And Development

Comparative Politics Of Environment And Development
AP GEOG 4051 3.00
This course applies a political ecological approach to the understanding of nature-society relationships. Using case studies from Asia, Africa and the America, the course examines the everyday realities of people and landscapes affected by environmental change, conflict and conversation.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed and AP/GEOG 3050 3.00 or permission of the instructor
Format: 3h Lecture per week

GEOG 4060 - Women In North America: Historical Geographies Of Gender And Sexuality

Women In North America: Historical Geographies Of Gender And Sexuality
AP GEOG 4060 3.00
This course explores the changing geographies of women in Canada and the United States over the past three centuries, focusing on the historical and spatial construction of gender.
Expanded Course Description
A theoretical and substantive exploration of the changing geographies of women in Canada and the United States over the past three centuries. The course has three principal themes: the historical and spatial production of the concept of gender and gender inequality; the multiple meanings of women's spaces and places, and the impact of changes to those geographies; and a comparison of the experiences of women in Canada with those in the United States. The approach of the class is interdisciplinary.
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed
Format: 3h Seminar per week

GEOG 4090 - Urban Identities: Historical Perspectives On Race, Ethnicity, Class And Gender In Canadian And American Cities

Urban Identities: Historical Perspectives On Race, Ethnicity, Class And Gender In Canadian And American Cities
AP GEOG 4090 3.00
This course considers the historical and spatial construction of racial, ethnic, gender and class identities in the broader context of urban development in Canada and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Expanded Course Description
A consideration of the historical and spatial construction of racial, ethnic, gender and class identities, and the relationships among them, in the broader context of urban development in Canada and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis is on the urban nature of these identities and the production of communities along these lines. Selected topics range from riots to suburbs to AIDS.
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed and one of: AP/GEOG 2220 6.00 or AP/GEOG 4040 6.00 or AP/GEOG 4170 3.00 or AP/GL/WMST 3505 3.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 9.00 or AP/SOSC 3760 6.00 or AP/SOCI 3830 6.00 or AP/SOCI 4055 6.00 or AP/SOCI 4120 6.00, or permission of instructor
Format: 3h Seminar per week

GEOG 4095 - Aboriginal Space And The City: North American Urbanization And Aboriginal People, 1890-1980

Aboriginal Space And The City: North American Urbanization And Aboriginal People, 1890-1980
AP GEOG 4095 3.00
This course considers the historical construction of Aboriginal space in Canada and the US and its relationship to cities, from early colonization to the present.
Expanded Course Description
The interdisciplinary course explores the historical construction of Aboriginal space in Canada and US, and its relationship to cities. It does so as a cross-border study, examining this process in both Canada and the US, thereby viewing the border as part of this colonial mapping of space in North America. Canada and the United States are predominantly urban nations, and have been since the early part of the century. In contrast, Aboriginal people have remained predominantly rural, tied to reservation lands. This course explores the way in which this difference was imagined, as well as the impact this spatial arrangement had on Aboriginal economies, politics, and identity. It also draws attention to the various ways in which Aboriginal people have responded to this process. An interdisciplinary course, it draws on Geography, History and Native Studies, among others.
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed
Format: 3h Seminar per week

GEOG 4130 - Planning Suburbs

Planning Suburbs
AP GEOG 4130 3.00
From garden suburbs to post-war inner- and outer-suburbs, from New Urbanist communities to edge cities, technoburbs, and exurbs, this course critically considers the planning of suburban built form and the suburbanization process in historical perspective. Consideration is given to the mechanisms and the challenges of managing suburban growth, and to the complex socio-cultural geographies and values that shape the suburbs and the suburban way of life. Attention is directed to issues of gender, racialized poverty, unemployment, infrastructural inadequacy, sprawl, and sustainability, and an effort is made to envision alternative futures.
Expanded Course Description
Format: 3h Seminar per week

GEOG 4150 -Foodscapes And Agri-Scapes: Geographical Perspectives

Foodscapes And Agri-Scapes: Geographical Perspectives
AP GEOG 4150 3.00
The course explores the landscapes and scales of food and agriculture. Questions include: Can we change ourselves and the world through what we eat? Why do we still have world hunger? Who really controls how food is produced and consumed? Emphasis is given to food and agricultural geographies in the global south.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: 84 credits completed
Format: 3h Seminar per week

GEOG 4170 - Geographic Perspectives On Immigration, Ethnicity And Race In Modern Cities

Geographic Perspectives On Immigration, Ethnicity And Race In Modern Cities
AP GEOG 4170 3.00
This course first discusses a number of conceptual issues concerning the residential segregation of ethnic and racial groups. The course then considers several case examples that exemplify the varied experiences of ethnic and racial groups in modern cities.
Expanded Course Description
This course is divided into two major sections. In the first section we discuss contemporary migration trends and then focus on the settlement patterns of immigrants in major urban centres and immigrant experiences in local labor and housing markets. Topics include international population movements, Canadian immigration policies and trends, patterns of segregation, transnational migration, and the reasons for and consequences of segregation. In the second section we consider how geographies of housing and labour markets are linked and the consequences of labour market segmentation. The focus is primarily on immigrant flows in the post-World War Two period. Examples are drawn from a variety of cities and cultural contexts but particular stress is placed on the Canadian experience and especially immigrant settlement in the Toronto area.
Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor. Third-year Honours students with 78 credits completed who are also taking summer courses may enrol
Format: Lecture and discussion periods

GEOG 4180 - Laboratory Analysis Of Ecological Materials

Laboratory Analysis Of Ecological Materials
AP/SC GEOG 4180 3.00
This course introduces students to a comprehensive range of laboratory techniques for the analysis of plant, soil and water samples. Laboratory sessions and projects provide students with experience in analytical procedures and the operation of major items of laboratory equipment.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: Six credits in physical geography at the 3000 or 4000 level or ES/ENVS 2410 3.00 or ES/ENVS 2420 3.00 or LE/EATS 1010 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00
Format: 4h Lecture/Lab hours, 3 additional lab hours

GEOG 4190 - Geographies Of The Ethnic Economy

Geographies Of The Ethnic Economy
AP GEOG 4190 3.00
This course examines how location helps, hinders, or shapes ethnic economies; how various socio-cultural, economic-politico, institutional, and transnational spaces shape ethnic economies; how ethnic economies and other geographically identifiable phenomenon, such as residential segregation or institutional distributions, are related; and how ethnic economies shape the urban landscape.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: 84 credits completed; at least one of AS/GEOG 2100 6.00, AP/GEOG 2105 3.0, AP/GEOG 2220 6.00, AP/GEOG 3140 3.00 or permission of instructor
Format: 3h Lecture/Seminar/discussion per week

GEOG 4200 - Water Quality And Stream Ecosystems

Water Quality And Stream Ecosystems
AP/SC GEOG 4200 3.00
The course focuses on selected aspects of river water quality, including hillslope hydrology and the transport of pollutants, the impacts of human activities on water chemistry, nutrient transformations within stream ecosystems, and the effects of water quality on stream biological communities.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, ES/ENVS 2410 3.00, or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00
Format: 2h Lecture per week, 2h lab bi-weekly

GEOG 4205 - Climatology Of High Latitudes

Climatology Of High Latitudes
AP/SC GEOG 4205 3.00
A study of the processes of energy and moisture exchanges in polar regions with emphasis on the Canadian north. Topics include atmospheric and oceanic transport of energy, surface microclimate and the sensitivity of high latitude environments to climate change.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00 or permission of the Instructor.
Format: 3h Lecture per week

GEOG 4210 - Hydrometeorology

Hydrometeorology
AP/SC GEOG 4210 3.00
A study of the relationship between the atmosphere and the hydrosphere with the emphasis on the process of evaporation. The course includes an in-depth review of evaporation models and the instrumentation necessary for data acquisition.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00
Format: 3h Lecture per week, one full-day lab session

GEOG 4215 - Ecological Climatology

Ecological Climatology
AP/SC GEOG 4215 3.00
Expanded Course Description
The field of Ecological Climatology provides an interdisciplinary framework for understanding how terrestrial ecosystems function in relation to climate systems. It examines the physical, chemical and biological processes by which landscapes affect and are affected by climate. The central theme is that ecosystems, through their cycling of energy, water, chemical elements and race gases are important determinants of climate. The coupling between climate and vegetation is seen at spatial scales from the leaf to biomes and at timescales from seconds to millennia. Both natural vegetation dynamics and human induced land-use changes are mechanism of climate change. The course combines a theoretical understanding of ecological climatology with applied experimentation to reinforce the principals involved.
Prerequisites: AP/SC GEOG 2400 6.00; and either AP/SC GEOG 2500 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00; and either AP/SC GEOG 2420 3.00 Ior SC/BIOL 2060 3.00 or permission of the Instructor
Format: 2h Lecture + 3h Lab per week

GEOG 4220 - Geographies Of Industry: Neoliberal Era

Geographies Of Industry: Neoliberal Era
AP GEOG 4220 3.00
This course draws on contemporary institutional approaches and theories of regulation to interpret trends in industrial production and location in the current neoliberal age. Emphasis is put on concepts of: restructuring; the evolution of post-Fordist systems of production; new regional and global divisions of labour; neo-artisanal production; the emergence of new industrial spaces; cultural production; resource economies; and the social economy.
Expanded Course Description
This course examines the new geographies of industry that have emerged in the neoliberal age. An examination of changes in modes of production, and then of changes in the regulatory, institutional and cultural environment provides the base for interpreting a series of contemporary changes including: industrial restructuring; flexible, lean, neo-artisanal and other post-Fordist systems of production; various new divisions of labor; the emergence of new industrial spaces and the supply chains that them; the new resource economy in peripheral regions; learning regions, technopoles and hi-tech clusters; new global production arrangements; and the survival of informal work
Prerequisites: 72 credits passed, including one of AP/ECON 1010 3.00, AP/ECON 3230 3.00, AP/GEOG 2100 6.00 (AP/GEOG 2105 3.00), AP/GEOG 2220 6.00, or written permission of the Instructor
Format: 3h Seminar per week

GEOG 4240 - The Planning Of Urban Public Facilities

The Planning Of Urban Public Facilities
AP GEOG 4240 3.00
Theoretical and practical problems concerning the supply and distribution of public goods and services in urban areas.
Expanded Course Description
Considerable interest is shown by academics, planners, politicians and the public in the provision of public goods and services to urban dwellers. These goods and services include: emergency services, social services, utilities, recreation, leisure, transportation and communications. Interest ranges from theoretical treatment of abstract optimization problems to practical issues of conflict resolution. All recognize that the problem of defining and searching for an ideal level of supply and style of distribution is complex because multiple criteria and goals must be considered. Not infrequently many individuals and groups are involved in the determination of the criteria and goals. The search process (involving collection of information) may be lengthy and costly, opinions and preferences may shift during the study, and conflicts can arise. Problems of a theoretical and practical nature concerning the production, consumption and distribution of public goods and services in urban areas will be examined using literature from geography, economics, political science, planning and operations research. Empirical examples for cities in North America will be used.
Prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 9.00 or written permission of the Instructor.
Format: 3h Lecture per week

GEOG 4250 - Imagined Landscapes

Imagined Landscapes
AP GEOG 4250 3.00
This course examines the representation of landscapes in fictional literature, film, visual arts and music. Emphasis is placed on the power, purpose and problems of metaphor, symbolism and representation.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed
Format: 3h Lecture per week

GEOG 4260 - Applied Transportation Geography

Applied Transportation Geography
AP GEOG 4260 3.00
This course focuses on urban transportation planning and policy analysis as an area of research. It discusses the theoretical principles governing movement and planning, and analytically examines approaches to policy problems.
Expanded Course Description
This course focuses on urban transportation planning and policy analysis. The major objective is to make students aware that: (1) travel patterns are described such that they might be understood and behavior can be explained, (2) the search for explanation should invoke some theory, which, when operationalized can be used to adjust or control a system, and (3) the policy tools carry values as well as limitations.
Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 2100 6.00 (AP/GEOG 2105 3.00), AP/GEOG 2220 6.00
Format: 3h Lecture/Seminar/Discussions

GEOG 4280 - Imagining Toronto: Literary Geographies Of A City

Imagining Toronto: Literary Geographies Of A City
AP GEOG 4280 3.00
This course explores intersections of literature and place in the Toronto region, exposing students to critical and imaginative works on place, culture, and representation. Close readings of a wide selection of Torontobased literature are paired with critical scholarly works interrogating how places are invented, (re)presented, and (re)produced.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed or permission of instructor
Format: 3h Seminar per week

GEOG 4290 - Directed Reading

Directed Reading
AP/SC GEOG 4290 3.00
This course may be used for individualized study, in which case the student requires permission from a faculty member who agrees to supervise the program of directed reading and from the Chair of the department.
Expanded Course Description
Notes: See the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies section of the Undergraduate Programs Calendar for Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies regulations on Independent Reading Courses.
Only topics in physical geography are eligible for Science (SC) credit.
Application Process: An application form is available in the Department of Geography Undergraduate Program Office, N430 Ross

GEOG 4310 - Dynamics of Snow and Ice

Dynamics of Snow and Ice
AP/SC GEOG 4310 3.00
This course examines the formation, distribution, structure and degradation of snow, as well as lake, river and sea ice.
Expanded Course Description
In this course the occurrence and distribution, formation and degradation and the environmental consequences of snow, lake, river and sea ice are examined. Additional components of the cryosphere such as massive ice, ground ice and glaciers will be discussed. Physical processes and fieldwork are emphasized in the course.
Prerequisites: AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00
Format: 2h Lecture + 3h lab per week

GEOG 4340 - Geoinformatics: GIS II

Geoinformatics: GIS II
AP/SC GEOG 4340 3.00
Advanced course in geographic information systems (GIS), oriented around raster structures. Computer graphics for mapping introduced and work undertaken on finely divided surfaces. GIS considers both practical and theoretical questions of interpretation. Macintosh computers and raster-based software used for hands-on focus.
Expanded Course Description
Advanced course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), will cover: the fundamental concepts of spatial data management and spatial data models involved in modern GIS, file structures and management with ArcCatalog, GIS database construction and georeferencing with ArcScan, vector and raster- based spatial analysis and spatial decision support techniques. This course will present students with the fundamental concepts and advanced techniques of ArcGIS. It will also prepare students for applying GIS-based techniques to hand spatial data in various fields. ArcGIS and various extensions will be used for hands-on exercises. Application examples include site selection, predictive mapping, watershed-based hydrological modeling, stream network analysis, and environmental planning
Prerequisites: AP/SC/GEOG 3180 3.00, AP/SC GEOG 3340 3.00
Format: 2h Lecture + 2h Lab per week

GEOG 4380 - Urban Social Policy

Urban Social Policy
AP GEOG 4380 3.00
A critical examination of the links between urban social problems and state policies. The course studies how policy makers, planners and geographers understand and deal with social problems in the contemporary city and evaluates selected planning policies.
Expanded Course Description
This course explores the linkages among the geographies of inequalities, state policies and civil society. We will review a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches that uncover the contested meaning of social policy and note its variations over time and space. Some questions of concern relate to: how are marginal groups discriminated in the city? Is the urban form and design of cities exclusionary in nature? How do societies provide for social welfare that is in need of an equitable, educated, healthy and socially cohesive citizenry?  The focus will be on urban areas and particular emphasis is placed on the Canadian experience, although some examples are drawn from other regions of the world|
Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 1000 6.00, AP/GEOG1410 6.00, and at least six additional credits in human geography at the 2000 or 3000 level
Format: 3h Lecture/Seminar per week

GEOG 4395 - Asia Pacific Development: Geographical Perspectives

Asia Pacific Development: Geographical Perspectives
AP GEOG 4395 3.00
This course examines socio-economic development in the Asian-Pacific region from a Canadian prospective. In particular, the course focuses on geographical flows of migration, trade, investment and aid between Canada and Asia, and corresponding social, political and economic changes in Asian societies
Expanded Course Description
The rapid transformation of societies in East and Southeast Asia represents one of the   most important shifts in the geographical structure of the global economy in recent decades. Development in the countries of the Asia-Pacific region is, however, the product of global linkages as well as internal socio-economic and political change. This course explores such linkages and focuses upon those that integrate and implicate Canada in the socio-economic development of the region. In particular, the course examines the geographical flow of migration, trade, investment, and aid between Asia and Canada, and relates these flows to social and economic change in Asian societies. Topics to be covered will include: approaches to understanding Pacific Asian development; the construction of Pacific regionalism; development and restructuring processes in East and Southeast Asian societies; the social and economic dimensions of Canadian aid and human rights advocacy in Asia. Students will have opportunities to conduct studies of the Asian communities that have emerged in Toronto, and their place of origin.
Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed or written permission of the InstructorFormat: 2h Lecture + 1h Lab

GEOG 4400 - Physical Hydrology And Water Resources

Physical Hydrology And Water Resources
AP/SC GEOG 4400 3.00
An intermediate course in the physical principles of hydrological and water resource systems. Topics to be discussed include groundwater storage and flow, deterministic hydrological models and physical hydrological aspects of current water resource problems.
Expanded Course Description
The course examines the physical principles of hydrological and water resource systems. Emphasis is placed on developing a conceptual understanding of: the movement and storage of surface and ground water in the Canadian environment; basic deterministic modelling of hydrological processes; and physical hydrological aspects of current “hot” issues in water resources such as global change, ecohydrology and contaminant flow.|
Prerequisites: AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00
Format: 2h Lecture + 2h lab per weeK

GEOG 4410 - Desert Ecosystems

Desert Ecosystems
AP/SC GEOG 4410 3.00
This course focuses on the vegetation of the desert, species adaptations to high temperature and aridity and the interactions between organisms, and between plants and their environment.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 6.00

GEOG 4420 - Project Experience In Geography

Project Experience In Geography
AP/SC GEOG 4420 3.00
This course enables Honours students to apply work experience in geography to their degree program. It provides students an opportunity to put their classroom learning into practice in a non-academic environment. The objective is to encourage students to put geographic skills to work in the addressing of real world problems.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. Students must be registered in an Honours Geography Program and must have successfully completed at least 84 credits, including AP/SC/GEOG 3420 3.00

GEOG 4440 - Geoinformatics: Remote Sensing II

Geoinformatics: Remote Sensing II
AP/SC GEOG 4440 3.00
Sophisticated methods and techniques for collecting, processing and analyzing remote sensing data are examined. Special topics include image enhancement techniques (e.g. texture transforms), non-traditional image classification and data integration for incorporation of remote sensing data products into geographic information systems (GIS).
Expanded Course Description
This course aims to provide every student with a working knowledge of sophisticated methods and techniques for collecting, processing and analyzing remote sensing data along with the theories and practices of undertaking remote sensing projects. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on image processing, image analysis, image classification, and data integration. The goal is to apply remote sensing in geographical analysis and environmental monitoring. This course is composed of lectures, laboratories, individual and group analysis, a term paper, and student presentations.
Cross-listings: ES/ENVS 4521 3.00
Prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 6.00 AP/GEOG 3440 3.00 or ES/ENVS 3521 3.00 or LE/EATS 4220 3.00 or written permission of the Instructor
Format: 2h Lecture + 2h Lab per week

GEOG 4500 - Northern Forest Environments

Northern Forest Environments
AP/SC GEOG 4500 3.00
An examination of the northern forested regions of Canada: Coastal, Subalpine, Montane, Columbian, Boreal, Great Lakes-St. Lawrence and Acadian Forests. Various aspects of each region are explored, including vegetation composition and development, environmental conditions and major disturbance regimes.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00, and AP/SC/GEOG 2500 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00 or permission of instructor.
Format: 2h Lecture +2h Lab per week

GEOG 4520 - Research Design And Field Studies In Human Geography

Research Design And Field Studies In Human Geography
AP GEOG 4520 3.00
This course puts into practice what students have learned in GEOG 3520 3.00: Designing and Conducting research in Human Geography. The course integrates on-campus preparation, data analysis and report writing with off-campus fieldwork during which data collection and preliminary analysis are carried out. The fieldwork relates to a geographic problem offering scope for the special interests of students in various aspects of Geography.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: Students must be registered as Honours majors in Geography and must have successfully completed 54 credits, including AP/SC GEOG 1400 6.00 or AK GEOG 2510 6.00, AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AK/GEOG 2500 6:00; AP/SC GEOG 2420 3.00 and AP/GEOG 3520 3.00; or permission of the course director.
Notes:    Additional Fees may be incurred to cover the expense of transportation and accommodation for out-of-town field trips.  Please contact the Department of Geography Program Office (N430 Ross) for additional details.

GEOG 4600 - Rivers: Environment And Process

Rivers:  Environment And Process
AP/SC GEOG 4600 3.00
This course provides fundamental knowledge of river mechanics and related environmental conditions. It provides an integration of physical, environmental and spatial aspects of river behaviour. The course involves the application of principles of hydrology, geomorphology, sedimentology and fluid mechanics.
Expanded Course Description

GEOG 4605 - The Greater Toronto Area – A Geographical Perspective

The Greater Toronto Area – A Geographical Perspective
AP GEOG 4605 3.00
This course examines the processes and issues of urban growth and change in the Greater Toronto Area, including the forces shaping growth, the consequences of growth, and planning initiatives/proposals for managing growth.
Expanded Course Description
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed or permission of Instructor
Format: 3h Seminar per week

GEOG 4610 - Geopolitics

Geopolitics
AP GEOG 4610 3.00
This course examines the geographic basis of the political evolution of the nation-state, from its emergence in Western Europe to its varied diffusions throughout the world. It explores notions of turf and territory, nationalism and the growth of geopolitical awareness.
Expanded Course Description
This course examines how concepts and practices of turf, territory, nationalism and the nation-state have come to order the world and dominate its politics. A central focus of the course is on the ‘state’, and how it has altered its geographical expression over the past half-millennium. This focus will be used to explore the structure and evolution of the geopolitical map of the world into the transnational, and perhaps postnational, 21st century.
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00
Format: 3h Lecture/Discussion per week

GEOG 4850 - The State, Civil Society and Spaces of Development

The State, Civil Society and Spaces of Development
AP GEOG 4850 3.00
This course deals with theoretical and empirical understandings of the ways in which the state and civil society organizations co-determine the geography of development.
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00
Format: 3h Lecture/Discussion per week

GEOG 4880 - Spaces Of Conflict, Violence, And Power

Spaces Of Conflict, Violence, And Power
AP GEOG 4880 3.00
This course examines the spatial aspects of conflict, violence, and power across various scales from the body to the transnational arena. Topics include territory and state violence, terrorism, forced migration, environmental conflict, and the spatial dimensions of resisting violence.
Expanded Course Description
In this course we will examine the spatial dimensions of conflict, violence, and power across various scales from the body to the nation-state and transnational arena. We begin with the premise that space is not simply the static backdrop upon which conflict unfolds and power relations play out. We will examine, rather, how conflict, violence, and power relations emerge from particular spatial relations such as territorial boundaries and access to environmental resources. We will investigate, moreover, how conflict, violence, and power relations reshape spaces, from the redrawing of territorial boundaries to the emergence of warscapes, prisons, and traumatized bodies. Building from this, we will investigate the ways in which goods, capital, and people move across—as well as create—spaces of conflict by looking at forced migration and displacement and extractive economies such as those of diamonds and oil. Ultimately, by bringing space, violence, and power into conversation, we will attempt to unearth and understand some of the root causes of conflict and violence in the modern world and what might be done to prevent and address them.
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed
Format: 3h Seminar/Discussion per week

GEOG 4900 - Public Space

Public Space
AP GEOG 4900 3.00
This course examines the existence, genealogies, qualities, significance, and use of public space, as well as past and emergent challenges and threats to public space.
Expanded Course Description
This course examines the ways in which the meaning and the purpose of public space have been (re)defined and (re)shaped in contemporary Western cities. We will critically reflect on the implications of the private production of a traditionally public amenity and on the implications of the increase in consumption, corporate branding, security, and surveillance in public space. Through discussion we will debate the qualities, significance, and use of public space in order to determine whose space is public space. Artists working with public space as a medium are at the forefront of many of the themes addressed in the course and provide compelling and playful examples to illustrate course material.
Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed
Format: 3h Seminar per week